New Snap Wallet!

Have a look at our newest wallet addition, the Snap Wallet. In designing our leather wallets, we've focused on unique designs that hold a practical amount of cards and cash in a minimalist package. The wallets are made to easily accommodate a minimal amount of cash, hence smaller compartments and flaps made to tuck a few bills into. 

With the snap wallet, we wanted to create something a little different. Something more cash-centric while maintaining a stylish and compact aesthetic. The main pocket is made to hold a good number of bills folded in half, so you don't have to quarter your bills into a small pocket. The bills slide in easily because we hand burnish the inside of the wallet to be very smooth. A minimalist slot stores cards separately from the cash without the added bulk of extra layers and pockets. The slot is ideal for 2-3 cards, but can accommodate a couple more when stretched. If you need to carry more cards, they can also fit in the main pocket without hindering cash use. Finally, the snap flap folds over to secure everything in place so there's no chance of anything falling out.

Glass slicker used to burnish smooth the inside surface of the leather.

As always, we hand stitch with linen thread.

One of the nice features of the card slot is that as it gets used, the upper part tucks slightly under the bottom section, giving the effect of a full pocket and making it very easy to slide in cards.

Moleskine Notebook Cover with Pen Sheath

We recently created a custom large Moleskine cover with a built in pen sheath. Over the years we've occasionally made covers that included a pen holder or loop, but were never really happy with it. This one, however, came out particularly nice and we're thinking of making it a regular option for the covers. I especially love the contrast between the brown Horween Chromexcel and the Mesa (Horween Derby) which is similar to the Chromexcel but full of extra character. 

Checkbook Wallet

A customer requested this checkbook wallet after seeing one we made a while back on Instagram. I forgot how nice these feel - I might even modify the design to add snaps. The outside piece of the checkbook cover is made with the same thinner chromexcel we use on the Flapjack Wallet, and the inside is natural chromexcel. This one has three pockets that hold the checkbook, a good number of bills, and extra paper or cards.

Feel free to email us if you'd like one for yourself!

checkbook wallet
Marking out the leather.

Marking out the leather.

Inkleaf logo.

Inkleaf logo.

Hand stitching with linen thread.

Hand stitching with linen thread.

Leather cut and holes punched.

Leather cut and holes punched.

Beveled edge.

Beveled edge.

stitching
wallet filled
leather checkbook wallet

Thread Snipper Case

This week's leather project is a thread snipper case/sheath. The snippers came with a plastic case, but we wanted something nicer. The case also needed to snap on securely so whether the snippers were thrown in a stitching pouch or hung up on a pegboard it wouldn't fall off. I used 2/3oz Hermann Oak vegtan leather, and gave it a coat of oil and leather wax. It will darken further in time with sunlight and more oil. 

leather snipper sheath.jpg
Drawing around the snippers.

Drawing around the snippers.

Setting the snap pieces after cutting out the leather. You can see I attached the two leather pieces together to make sure the snippers fit.

Setting the snap pieces after cutting out the leather. You can see I attached the two leather pieces together to make sure the snippers fit.

Using the marking wheel. I don't normally use this tool, but it worked well to mark the stitches around the curve.

Using the marking wheel. I don't normally use this tool, but it worked well to mark the stitches around the curve.

Some oil and wax. Ready to stitch.

Some oil and wax. Ready to stitch.

Edge after sanding.

Edge after sanding.

Border added to account for stitching and tab added for the snap. This was then cut out and used as a template over the leather.

Border added to account for stitching and tab added for the snap. This was then cut out and used as a template over the leather.

Checking to see where the bottom part of the snap should be placed.

Checking to see where the bottom part of the snap should be placed.

Stitch holes ready and snaps set.

Stitch holes ready and snaps set.

Raw edge of the stitched case.

Raw edge of the stitched case.

And here it is, burnished to a nice smooth edge. I use a couple of different burnishing methods, but for this one I dampened the edge with water and burnished with canvas, then rubbed in some beeswax until it became smooth with a bit of shine.

And here it is, burnished to a nice smooth edge. I use a couple of different burnishing methods, but for this one I dampened the edge with water and burnished with canvas, then rubbed in some beeswax until it became smooth with a bit of shine.

The finished case with the thread snippers!

The finished case with the thread snippers!

Kangaroo Doublecross Wallet

We've finished the kangaroo leather Doublecross wallet and here are our impressions. In the pictures you'll see the crafting process as well as comparisons with our regular chromexcel wallet. Now that we've worked with this leather, I can say that we are very happy with it. The feel of the leather is great, it tools and burnishes well, and it makes for an ultra thin yet durable wallet. We'll likely make a wallet for ourselves to see how it ages and tans over time.

In the comparisons below, you can see that the thinner leather reduces the overall thickness of the wallet visibly though not drastically. The 4oz chromexcel works really well for these wallets and they don't feel clunky or thick in the hand. However, if you're looking to get your wallet as thin as possible, the kangaroo wallet is basically the thickness of the cards themselves plus a little extra. Shoot us an email if you'd like one of these for yourself!

Marking and cutting the Doublecross wallet out of the kangaroo leather. In this picture I'm cutting a test piece from the stretchier scrap part of the leather. With the leather being so thin, I needed to slightly adjust the dimensions. 

Marking and cutting the Doublecross wallet out of the kangaroo leather. In this picture I'm cutting a test piece from the stretchier scrap part of the leather. With the leather being so thin, I needed to slightly adjust the dimensions. 

Edging the tooled wallet.

Edging the tooled wallet.

Burnishing the edges. This leather burnishes really well.

Burnishing the edges. This leather burnishes really well.

A layer of oil to condition before stitching.

A layer of oil to condition before stitching.

The finished wallet!

The finished wallet!

kangaroo leather wallet
Comparing the kangaroo wallet with 4oz Horween Chromexcel. They are both filled with seven cards.

Comparing the kangaroo wallet with 4oz Horween Chromexcel. They are both filled with seven cards.

leather comparison
The thinner leather helps to reduce the gap between the pockets. (I realized after the fact that the chromexcel wallet only has six cards...)

The thinner leather helps to reduce the gap between the pockets. (I realized after the fact that the chromexcel wallet only has six cards...)

From the bottom.

From the bottom.

And finally a closeup to show the difference side by side. 

And finally a closeup to show the difference side by side. 

Kangaroo Leather

It's here! A customer requested one of our Doublecross wallets in this leather, and we’re glad to be trying it out because this is some really nice leather. It's thin, as you can see in the pictures, yet very strong. The surface feels smooth and durable… it almost feels soft compared to the vegetable tanned cow leather we have on hand. Both leathers are great, but the kangaroo will have some special uses. Because of its strength, it’ll be great for lacing material as well as super thin yet durable wallets. It’s also twice the cost of our normal leather so we’ll be somewhat selective with the projects we make with this one. In the next post we’ll talk about making the Doublecross wallet out of the kangaroo leather and our thoughts after actually working with it.

The kangaroo leather. It's roughly 6 sq ft.

The kangaroo leather. It's roughly 6 sq ft.

It's very thin, and it actually comes even thinner than this.

It's very thin, and it actually comes even thinner than this.

The Inkleaf Show ep.01 - Crafting

In this episode we show you our leather crafting process as we make a few of our wallets. (www.inkleafleather.com)

Our first episode of life in the Inkleaf workshop! We're putting together short weekly videos that highlight a variety of workshop processes and happenings. You'll see our regular day to day leather crafting as well as special projects, custom orders, and new materials and tools. There may even be occasional discussions on running a small craft business. Click through the video above to watch on Youtube and subscribe to our channel!

A New Year: Leather Explorations

Another year has begun, and we find ourselves thinking on our goals for 2016. One thing we'd like to do more of this year is one off projects. Especially interesting and useful leather pieces for our leather tools and art tools. Maybe some pouches. Or a mini-bag for our little nephew. Definitely some tool sheaths. Some of these projects might even find their way into our regular product lineup, but our focus will be on unique items rather than production.

The first explorations will likely be made of kangaroo leather. That's a first for us. It's thin yet very strong, and may open up some interesting project possibilities. For starters, we're thinking about thin wallet designs and pouches for watercolor travel brushes.

We'll be updating this space with ongoing projects - we should have pictures of the kangaroo leather very soon!