wallet

Old Wallet, New Life

It's rare that we get to see one of our wallets again. We make them and ship them off. We hope they live a long life of usefulness and maybe inspire a small measure of happiness. 

After nearly 6 1/2 years of Inkleaf, this is actually the first time we've receive an item back for restitching. After three years of good hard wear, it was ready for new thread. Since this wallet was originally created, we've switched to a more durable linen thread (Lin Cable), so my hope is that it will last even longer this time. I'm also trying out the very durable Tiger polyester thread in personal projects, and it is great stuff! It's good to have options.

This is a good place to put out a reminder that we will restitch any of our products. There is no fee for the repair other than the cost of shipping, and it doesn't matter when you purchased your wallet or notebook cover. If you need some repair done, shoot us an email!

 

Before

This is the Doublecross wallet before restitching. This is actually a great example of the strength of saddle stitching. Ever pulled on a loose stitch on cheap or worn out clothing and it just unraveled down the entire line? That's a weakness of the machine lock stitch. On the other hand because of the structure of the saddle stitch, even if the thread wears out on one side the thread on the other side will remain in place and won't unravel all at once. That doesn't mean machine stitching is always bad. It can still be durable especially with good quality thread. It just depends on what the job calls for. When it comes to leather, the saddle stitch is such a great look with the benefit of added durability. 

before front wallet
before back of wallet
 

After

Here the wallet is restitched with our newer Lin Cable.

restitched wallet front
restitched wallet back

The restitched wallet next to a new wallet. The one on the left started out the same color as the leather on the right. Look at that character! It seemed to have taken on some denim indigo dye, and I imagine it's seen plenty of sun. Combine that with lots of burnishing in the jeans pocket and leather can really take on some amazing patina.

new wallet and patina leather

Even though the leather had darkened quite a bit, the pull up looked even better. That's the lighter color you see on some types of leather when pressure is applied and the oils are temporarily displaced.

pull up on leather

This wallet is back with its owner and I hope it sees many more years of good use!

Checkbook Wallet

A customer requested this checkbook wallet after seeing one we made a while back on Instagram. I forgot how nice these feel - I might even modify the design to add snaps. The outside piece of the checkbook cover is made with the same thinner chromexcel we use on the Flapjack Wallet, and the inside is natural chromexcel. This one has three pockets that hold the checkbook, a good number of bills, and extra paper or cards.

Feel free to email us if you'd like one for yourself!

checkbook wallet
Marking out the leather.

Marking out the leather.

Inkleaf logo.

Inkleaf logo.

Hand stitching with linen thread.

Hand stitching with linen thread.

Leather cut and holes punched.

Leather cut and holes punched.

Beveled edge.

Beveled edge.

stitching
wallet filled
leather checkbook wallet

Kangaroo Doublecross Wallet

We've finished the kangaroo leather Doublecross wallet and here are our impressions. In the pictures you'll see the crafting process as well as comparisons with our regular chromexcel wallet. Now that we've worked with this leather, I can say that we are very happy with it. The feel of the leather is great, it tools and burnishes well, and it makes for an ultra thin yet durable wallet. We'll likely make a wallet for ourselves to see how it ages and tans over time.

In the comparisons below, you can see that the thinner leather reduces the overall thickness of the wallet visibly though not drastically. The 4oz chromexcel works really well for these wallets and they don't feel clunky or thick in the hand. However, if you're looking to get your wallet as thin as possible, the kangaroo wallet is basically the thickness of the cards themselves plus a little extra. Shoot us an email if you'd like one of these for yourself!

Marking and cutting the Doublecross wallet out of the kangaroo leather. In this picture I'm cutting a test piece from the stretchier scrap part of the leather. With the leather being so thin, I needed to slightly adjust the dimensions. 

Marking and cutting the Doublecross wallet out of the kangaroo leather. In this picture I'm cutting a test piece from the stretchier scrap part of the leather. With the leather being so thin, I needed to slightly adjust the dimensions. 

Edging the tooled wallet.

Edging the tooled wallet.

Burnishing the edges. This leather burnishes really well.

Burnishing the edges. This leather burnishes really well.

A layer of oil to condition before stitching.

A layer of oil to condition before stitching.

The finished wallet!

The finished wallet!

kangaroo leather wallet
Comparing the kangaroo wallet with 4oz Horween Chromexcel. They are both filled with seven cards.

Comparing the kangaroo wallet with 4oz Horween Chromexcel. They are both filled with seven cards.

leather comparison
The thinner leather helps to reduce the gap between the pockets. (I realized after the fact that the chromexcel wallet only has six cards...)

The thinner leather helps to reduce the gap between the pockets. (I realized after the fact that the chromexcel wallet only has six cards...)

From the bottom.

From the bottom.

And finally a closeup to show the difference side by side. 

And finally a closeup to show the difference side by side.